HOW ART CHALLENGES GRAVITY AND LIGHT IN OUR HABITAT

The subversive power of art is playing a precious role in providing architecture with risky yet palpable visions of the future. No wonder Tomás Saraceno, an Argentinian artist and architect based in Frankfurt and Berlin, receives considerable attention these days. Saraceno’s installations, sculptures and photographic work have been exhibited worldwide, including at the 53rd Venice Biennale; at the Musée d’Art Moderne, Luxembourg; the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. Saraceno develops utopian spaces inspired by evocative elements like soap bubbles, spider webs, chocolate milk foam, astronomical constellations, dust particles and clouds. He has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that aim beyond the sensorial effect, inviting the viewer to consider alternative forms of knowledge, feelings and interaction with others. In Berlin, Saraceno will demonstrate how his collaborations with scientists at NASA as well as with a range of engineers, chemists, botanists, astrophysicists and biologists offer new social alternatives to the political, social, cultural and military restrictions that are accepted today.

Tomás Saraceno

Studio Tomás Saraceno

The subversive power of art is playing a precious role in providing architecture with risky yet palpable visions of the future. No wonder Tomás Saraceno, an Argentinian artist and architect based in Frankfurt and Berlin, receives considerable attention these days. Saraceno’s installations, sculptures and photographic work have been exhibited worldwide, including at the 53rd Venice Biennale; at the Musée d’art Moderne, Luxembourg; the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. Saraceno develops utopian spaces inspired by evocative elements like soap bubbles, spider webs, chocolate milk foam, astronomical constellations, dust particles and clouds. He has established a practice of constructing habitable networks based upon complex geometries and interconnectivity that aim beyond the sensorial effect, inviting the viewer to consider alternative forms of knowledge, feelings and interaction with others.